On NFT and heritage: Questioning the notion of legacy itself

Garry Kasparov uses NFTs to shake up the fundamental ideas of tradition, legacy, and history in order to usher in the new era of Web 3.0. Israeli serial entrepreneur Ariel Shapira analyzes developing technologies in the crypto, decentralized finance (DeFi), and blockchain areas, as well as their roles in creating the economy of the twenty-first century, in his monthly crypto tech column.


Two key patterns can be seen when looking at the nonfungible token (NFT) ecosystem as it has developed in recent months. On the one hand, a completely new market that allows various artists to participate in a new creator economy — the creators of the Bored Ape Yacht Club, various types of pixel art creators, and creative flickers like the creator of long-necked women's paintings, the sale of which brought the artist, who is only 12 years old, close to 1,394 Ether (ETH), equal at the time of writing $6 million.

However, the fact is that an NFT is much more. Take, for example, one of the first large NFT transactions, when Jack Dorsey sold the first tweet on Twitter for $2.9 million at the time. Although this NFT acquired value, its integration as an NFT retained a form of legacy.

When Twitter or the obsolete text platform vanishes from the web, as many other sites that were once part of the web's chronicles have, the only things left will be those for which someone has established commercial worth, in addition to symbolic significance. A distinctive asset that stands alone and makes the preservation of history and legacy a long-term business.

NFTs are Garry Kasparov's specialty.

Garry Kasparov, the former world chess champion who held the title for the longest period of time, has opted to digitize his legacy and transform huge chapters of his history into an NFT. "My NFT partnership with 1Kind represents my longstanding drive to take on new challenges and collaborate with cutting-edge technology," Kasparov adds. "I've always felt that innovation is the only path ahead, from artificial intelligence to cryptocurrencies and the blockchain. We've collaborated closely from the beginning to develop not only one-of-a-kind objects, but also an entirely new manner of employing NFTs to convey a tale with true history."

Kasparov's interest in human-machine interactions is one of the most intriguing aspects of his personality. Kasparov is widely regarded as the greatest chess player of all time. The youngest person to win the world championship and the world chess champion with the longest reign.

But it was his clashes against supercomputers that made him famous throughout the world. Kasparov has conquered state-of-the-art chess machines on several occasions, but his loss to IBM's Deep Blue computer in 1997 was a watershed moment, symbolizing the reality that artificial intelligence may match and even surpass human intellect. On a symbolic level, it was precisely this defeat that connected Kasparov's fate to the digital age's progress. Now, with the NFT initiative, which Kasparov is launching with the 1Kind platform, he's upending basic ideas like heritage, legacy, and history once more. Kasparov wants to develop a digital presence for different periods of his life, producing a legacy that isn't reliant on displays, display cabinets, or history books. Objects, photographs, and artworks from his past, He drops through NFTs to maintain a history before it fades, and to bring in additional individuals who are interested in conserving that tradition, not to promote some creative economy like the Dorsey tweet. As Kasparov puts it:

"This is the first time that my complete life — my life — will be transformed into NFTs. I wanted to convey everything that shaped me and my legacy on and off the chessboard, not just my chess games and accomplishments."


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